Sunday, January 31, 2010

Luis Posada Carriles: I don't remember, I don't recall


Lawyers for Luis Posada Carriles complained on Dec. 11 that prosecutors didn’t provide enough detail in their perjury accusations against their client. U.S. District Court Judge Kathleen Cardone ordered prosecutors to provide more detail. And on Saturday, prosecutors did just that.
Acting U.S. Attorney Michael J. Mullaney filed a 20-page document that spells out at least 27 instances in which Posada Carriles made false or misleading statements.

A few things stand out:
• Posada Carriles’ strategy in dealing with immigration authorities: Admit nothing, claim he can’t recall or doesn’t understand.
• Posada Carriles' surprising claim that the Cuban government – and not him or any other anti-Castro activists – planted 33 pounds of C-4 explosives in Panama near where Fidel Castro was speaking in 2000.
• The historical importance of Posada Carriles’ candid interviews with Ann Louise Bardach on June 17-18, 1998, in Aruba. These are a critical element in the government’s case against him. What Posada Carriles confessed to Bardach with certain pride in 1998 has come back to haunt him. The interviews were part of a five-part series on militant groups that the New York Times published between May and July 1998. Bardach and Larry Rohter reported the stories.
The court document filed Saturday lists five alleged lies on Posada Carriles’ June 13, 2005, immigration form I-589, along with what prosecutors say are the facts.

1) Question: What other names have you used?
Posada Carriles: N/A or Not Applicable.
Fact: He used the names or aliases “Ramon Medina,” “LOBO,” “SOLO,” “Manuel Enrique Castillo Lopez,” “Francisco Rodriguez Mena,” “Jose Rivas Lopez,” “Bambi,” and “Ignacio Medina,” among others.

2) Question: List each entry to the U.S. beginning with your most recent entry.
Posada Carriles: At the “Mexican Border” on “3/26/2005.”
Fact: He entered via Florida on March 18, 2005.

3) Question: “Are you fluent in English?”
Posada Carriles: “No.”
Fact: He is fluent in English.

4) Question: “Provide the following information about your residences during the last five years.”
Posada Carriles: “Does not remember” the “Number and street,” “City/Town” and “Department, Province or State” in which he lived in Panama.
Fact: He had to have recalled he was in prison in Panama during that four-year period.

5) Question: “Have you, your spouse, or child(ren) ever ordered, incited, assisted, or otherwise participated in causing harm or suffering to any person because of his or her race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or belief in a particular political opinion?”
Posada Carriles: “No.”
Fact: Posada Carriles has taken violent action against others in opposition to their political opinions.

Fidel Castro and Luis Posada Carriles. Source of photo.

Prosecutors also say Posada Carriles “knowingly and willfully gave false, evasive and misleading testimony, and withheld information” while testifying under oath during an immigration hearing in federal court on August 30, 2005. In the document, I counted 22 instances in which Posada Carriles is accused of lying or giving evasive or misleading testimony.

1) Question in English: And isn’t it true that during the series of interviews with Miss Bardach, that you admitted that you were involved in the planning and preparation of those bombing attacks in Cuba that occurred in 1997?
English translation of Posada’s response in Cuban Spanish: I cannot answer with a yes or no. I will need to clarify that.
The interview was done in English, a language that I do not know.
Question in English: Now, you are not completely illiterate, uh, in English, is that correct?
Posada Carriles: No, It’s not completely unknown to me, but I have difficulties with my ear . . . when I hear it, I can’t capture it well.
Fact: Posada Carriles understands English.

2) Posada Carriles said of the Bardach interview: There—there were illegal recordings made of—that interview.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew Bardach was recording portions of the interview with his consent.

3) Question in English: And at—at times the interview was also in Spanish, is that correct?
Posada Carriles: No.
Fact: The interview was at times conducted in Spanish.

4) Question in English: Did Ms. Bardach ever tell you why specifically she came to talk to you about anything?
Posada Carriles: No, sir.
Fact: Bardach interviewed Posada Carriles under mutually agreed-to terms about many anti-Castro activities, including among other things, the 1997 bombing campaign in Cuba.

5) Question in English: Okay. May I, uh, back up just to clarify for the record? Sir, you acknowledged that you were interviewed by Miss Salazar in August of 1998,
and, uh, the purpose of the interview was to clarify, uh, for the record, your interview with the, Ann Bardach of the New York Times, is that correct, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: I did not know that it was for that. She simply interviewed me.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew that Maria Elvira Salazar interviewed him to clarify the interview that he gave to Ann Louise Bardach of the New York Times.

6) Question: Isn’t true that the only retraction that the New York Times made was any reference you made that . . . any reference you made to the Cuban American
National Foundation, uh, having provided the funds in support of the Cuba, of the, uh, Cuba bombing campaign?
Posada Carriles: The—they also said that the difficulties that I have with the English language had caused that—that detail also in all the interview.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew the New York Times retraction had nothing to do with any language difficulties in the Bardach interview.

7) Posada Carriles: And, all those things caused to—to do a report but it—it wasn’t saying the whole truth.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew knew that the New York Times story accurately reported the substance of his statements to Bardach and accurately reported his involvement in the 1997 bombings in Cuba.

8) Question in English: Well. Let me be a little more specific. Isn’t it true that you told Miss Bardach that the purpose of the bombing campaign in Cuba was to generate publicity, uh, which would frighten away tourists from visiting Cuba? Did you tell her that, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: It could be that, that had been the purpose, but that doesn’t have to be. That does not mean that I was the [unintelligible].
Question in English: Isn’t it true that you told Miss Bardach, that you were involved in the planning and preparation for that bombing in Cuba?
Posada Carriles: I do not remember telling her that.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew the purpose of the bombing campaign was to frighten away tourists and he knew he told Bardach he was involved in the bombing campaign.

Ann Louise Bardach. Credit: Dawny Rothenberg

9) Question in English: Isn’t it true that you admitted to Miss Bardach that you have used the name Solo?
Posada Carriles: I do not remember telling her that either.
Fact: He admitted to Bardach that he used the name “Solo.”

10) Question in English: Isn’t it true that Miss Bardach had a copy of the fax, which is party of Government’s Exhibit One, Attachment A, and when you were shown that fax, you acknowledged or you admitted to Miss Bardach that you wrote the contents of that fax?
Posada Carriles: I do not remember that.
Fact: Posada Carriles told Bardach he was the author of the fax.

11) Question in English: And you also saw a male by the name of Jose Burgos in Guatemala in 1997, is that correct, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: I do not—do not know that man, that is to say, I do not remember that.
Question in English: Who else was with you and Jose Francisco Pepe Alvarez when you would, uh, gather at the business location of Antonio Alvarez?
Posada Carriles: From what I can remember, no one.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew Jose Burgos and remembered meeting him in Guatemala in 1997.

12) Question in English: Bardach. You discussed with her how you became a leader of the Cuban Exiles, uh, Clandestine Military Wing, plotting to kill Fidel Castro. Is that
correct?
Posada Carriles: Miss, let me clarify something. I did not read the interview. That happened many years ago and I don’t remember those things.
Fact: He read an account of the Bardach interview and falsely claimed a lack of recall.

13) Question in English: Did you not tell Miss Bardach that you were proud of the series of hotel bombings last year, uh, against Cuba?
Posada Carriles: I do not remember that.
Fact: Posada Carriles spoke with pride when recalling his role in the 1997 bombings.

14) Question in English: Sir, when you were interviewed by Miss Bardach, you stated that the FBI agent who had phoned Mr. Alvarez in Guatemala, Jorge Kiszinski, and that’s K-I-S-Z-I-N-S-K-I, you described the FBI agent to Miss Bardach as a very good friend whom you had known a long time. Is that correct, yes or no?
Question in English: The question is did you, did you tell her that he was
a good friend of yours?
Posada Carriles: No, I don’t remember having said that.
Fact: Posada Carriles has described Jorge Kiszinski as a good friend.

15) Question in English: All right. Well you were involved in soliciting other individuals to carry out the bombing in, the bombings in Cuba?
Posada Carriles: No.
Question in English: Now, you . . . do you . . . are you stating that the comments made by Ann Louise Bardach in the New York Times article, that you were involved in soliciting others, other individuals to engage in these bombings is not true?
Posada Carriles: I am saying that it is not true.
Fact: Posada Carriles knew he was involved in soliciting individuals to carry out the bombing campaign and he admitted his involvement to Bardach.

16) Question in English: Did you arrange for anyone, uh, when you were in Guatemala, did you arrange for anyone else to send Raul Cruz Leon to Cuba to set off bombs in 1997?
Posada Carriles: No.

17) Question in English: Did you, did you or anyone that you met with in Guatemala make arrangements for an El Salvadorian by the name of Otto Rene Rodriguez Llerena, and that’s spelled L–L-E-R-E-N-A, to go to Cuba in 1997 and set off bombs?
Posada Carriles: No.
Fact: Posada Carriles had arranged for Raul Cruz Leon and Otto Rene Rodriguez Llerena, among others, to conduct the 1997 bombing campaign in Cuba.

18) Question in English: You acknowledged to Miss Bardach that Raul Cruz Leon worked for you, isn’t that correct?
Posada Carriles: That also has an explanation . . . it has an explanation. To Mrs. Bardach, no.
Question in English: That’s your explanation, that you—
Posada Carriles: No—no—no, I thought it was something else. I thought it was something else.
Question in English: Did you ack . . . did you acknowledge to Miss Bardach or anyone that Raul Cruz Leon worked for you?
Posada Carriles: From what I can remember, no.
Fact: Posada Carriles acknowledged to Ann Louise Bardach and Maria Elvira Salazar
that Raul Cruz Leon was hired by someone who worked for him to participate in the 1997 bombing campaign in Cuba.

19) Question in English: Now do you recall, are you stating that you do not recall that you . . . of telling Miss Bardach that you planned the bombing.
Posada Carriles: That I . . . I don’t recall having said that.
Fact: Posada Carriles stated to Ann Louise Bardach that he had planned the 1997 bombing campaign in Cuba and recalled having stated it to her.

20) Question in English: When you entered the United States through Mexico, uh, in March of 2005, you did not present yourself for inspection to an Immigration officer at
that time. Is that correct, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: Yes, it is correct.
Question in English: After you entered the United States, you traveled by bus from Houston to Miami, is that correct, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: It is correct.
Question in English: Isn’t it true that you encountered, you were encountered by an Immigration officer while en route to Miami?
Posada Carriles: It is correct.
Question in English: And at that time you failed to identify yourself to Immigration officers during that encounter, is that correct?
Posada Carriles: They didn’t ask me for [unintelligible] . . . they didn’t ask me the, oh, yes, it is correct.
Fact: Posada Carriles entered the United States through Florida, not Mexico.

21) Question in English: Alright. Regarding your . . . the incident in Panama for which you were convicted of danger to security, the charges in that case revolved around you and
co-defendants who were in possession of 33 pounds of C-4 explosives in a vehicle, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: No, that is not correct the—the —the explosive was found in a—in a place, in one of those. Yeah, and it was planted by the Cuban government, and they put it there.
Question in English: Isn’t it true that you and your co-defendants were in Panama because you had devised a plan to assassinate Fidel Castro when he was scheduled to
appear at the Ibero American Summit on the campus of the University of Panama?
Posada Carriles: We were in Panama to— to . . . pick up an official . . . or a Cuban General that was going to desert.
Fact: Posada and his co-conspiractors were in Panama to try to assassinate Fidel Castro at the Ibero-American Summit in 2000.

22) Question in English: But, isn’t it a fact that you spoke to the FBI Legal Attache on November 22, 2000, and stated that you, in fact, planned to . . . planned the attack, however, abandoned the plan after determining that there would be, that there would have been too much collateral damage, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: I do not recall any of that.
Question in English: So, in the process of talking to you, did you state that the plan was to attack Fidel Castro, but it was abandoned . . . but you abandoned the plan after determining that there would have been too much collateral damage?
Posada Carriles: No—from what I can remember, no. From what I can remember—
Question in English: What did you say to the FBI?
Posada Carriles: Nothing, I didn’t tell them anything, I don’t, I don’t remember talking to them, only greeting them, “We are from the FBI,” a tall man, two came and they left.
Question in English: All right so, you didn’t talk to anyone, uh, with regard to your, the purpose of your presence in Panama? So, it’s basically you don’t recall whether you made that statement, yes or no?
Posada Carriles: I don’t—don’t remember, I repeat, that I don’t remember having talked about that with the FBI, nor with anyone else.
Fact: Posada Carriles did talk to an FBI legal attache in Panama and told him he and his co-conspirators had intended to assassinate Fidel Castro but abandoned the plan for fear of collateral damage.

The number of instances of alleged lies or misleading testimony comes to 27.

For some reason, all this reminds me of the Peter Gabriel song, "I don't remember."
I got no means to show identification
I got no papers show you what I am
You'll have to take me just the way that you find me
What's gone is gone and I do not give a damn
I don't remember, I don't recall
I got no memory of anything at all
Link:
Along the Malecon's Anti-Castro militants page

1 comment:

Dan said...

New Book Reveals Secret Life Of Cuban Terrorist Louis Posada

New York: March 11, 2010 (Caribbean New York Press) - A new book, “From Cubana to Santrina throws fresh light on the terrorist activities of Cuban dissident, Louis Posada Carilles, whose impending trial ( May 20) in an El Paso federal court in the United States is again attracting international media attention.
Written by New York based Guyanese Journalist Dhanraj Bhagwandin, the book highlights the trail of Bambi (one of Posada’s aliases) from Cuba to Venezuela and then to El Salvador where he was involved in drugs, prostitution and a death squad. Posada coordinated numerous plots to kill Cuba’s former President Fidel Castro and also helped the Contras in Nicaragua.
He has long been fingered as the mastermind of the bombing of a Cuban airline off the coast of Barbados in 1976 in which 73 persons perished including 11 Guyanese. Posada was on the run for nearly three decades until 2005 when he finally sneaked into the United States.
Based on interviews with Ex-Federal United States Drug Enforcement Agent Celerino ‘Cele’ Castillo III, and new declassified documents, Bhagwandin, an investigative journalist, brings a new perspective to this tragic international event involving Cuba, the United States and Venezuela.
Dhanraj Bhagwandin, the author, is a former journalist from Guyana who has covered several countries including Cuba He is also author of “Georgetown Spies” a tale of espionage involving American and Russian secret service agents. Bhagwandin also wrote for the now defunct Brooklyn Skyline newspaper and taught at York College and the Bronx Community College of the City University of New York.
The Cubana explosion in midair was the first act of terrorism in the Caribbean and Latin American.
The account reveals the genesis of the Cubana plot and the inner motivations of its author, Bambi. It also links his involvement with the American Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).
“Dhanraj Bhagwandin is the first writer of the Caribbean and North America to fictionalize the Cubana air disaster with such courage, craft, feelings and splendor,” according to Caribbean novelist Dr. Churaumanie Bissundyal.
For more information visit http://cubanatosantrina.com/
Email : caribnypress@yahoo.com