Saturday, May 31, 2014

New U.S. program targets Cuban youth

U.S. Interests Section in Havana
The State Department plans to spend $1,212,000 to send 75 to 100 Cuban teen-agers to the United States "to develop leadership skills and learn about civic participation and community engagement."
The teen-agers will remain in the U.S. for three to four weeks as part of the project, called "Summer Leadership Program for Cuban Youth."
Participants must be 16 to 18 years old. English proficiency is not required. The program will be conducted in Spanish.
The Cuban students will take part in "youth-appropriate leadership activities and workshops in a safe environment, interact with American youth and gain first-hand experience with community engagement."
Students will stay with American families for six to eight days during the program "to further introduce the students to American culture."
The State Department's Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs on May 29 announced that it is looking for a non-governmental organization or an educational institution to run the project. The application deadline is June 30.
According to the bureau's request for applications:
The program delivery should be primarily interactive activities, practical experiences, and other hands-on opportunities to learn about the fundamentals of a civil society, leadership skills, critical thinking, democratic principles and community service. The activities could include participation in clubs, camps, seminars, workshops, simulations and role-playing, teambuilding exercises, case studies, a volunteer service project, leadership training exercises, meetings, classroom visits, site visits, and social time among peers.
Other activities may include visits to historical sites, local, state and/or national government centers, community centers, non-governmental organizations, museums and landmarks that combine learning about the principles of government, history, and society with tourism.
Age-appropriate cultural enrichment activities that provide opportunities for participants to interact with each other and Americans may also be part of the program. Programming should include additional American participants wherever possible, accounting for a lack of English language proficiency from Cuban participants.
The program may also include a maximum three-day study tour to Washington, D.C.
The contractor hired to run the program will "play a primary role" in selecting students for the program. The U.S. Interests Section in Havana will help the contractor "in disseminating promotional materials and in student selection."
Participants will be chosen using "clearly identified criteria for the selection consistent with local law." I wonder how the selection could be "consistent with local law" since such a program would likely be regarded as illegal in Cuba.
The contractor will be required to obtain the approval of students' parent or guardian.
The State Department envisions 25 to 35 students taking part during the summer of 2015 and 50 to 65 during the summer of 2016.
Qualities that will enable students to be successful participants include "maturity, strong social skills, flexibility and open-mindedness."
For more information, see the request for applications below:

Summer Leadership Program for Cuban Youth

Announcement Type: New Grant
Public Opportunity Title: Summer Leadership Program for Cuban Youth
Catalog of Federal Domestic
Assistance (CFDA) Number: 19.750
Funding Amount: One award of up to $1,212,000 U.S. Dollars

Issuance Date: May 30, 2014

Deadline for Receipt of Questions: June 24, 2014
5:00 PM Eastern Standard Time

Closing Date and Time for Submission of Applications: June 30, 2014
5:00 PM Eastern Standard Time
Funding Activity Category: Civil Society
Program Type: Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA)
Grant Program: WHA
Assistance Type: Grant
Eligibility Category: U.S. non-profit/non-governmental organizations
(NGOs) having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, or an equivalent official status, and public and private institutions
of higher education
Applicant Type: Organizations
Est. Project Start Date: September 30, 2014
Est. Project End Date: November 1, 2016
Fiscal Year funding: FY2013
Award Ceiling: $1,212,000
Award Floor: $1,212,000
Cost Sharing Requirement: No
Electronic Requirement: Yes
Expected No. of Applications: N/A
Announcement Type: New Announcement


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The United States Department of State (DOS) Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA) announces a Request for Applications (RFA) to support a summer leadership program for Cuban youth with up to $1,212,000 in FY 2013 Economic Support Funds, subject to availability of funding, for a project period of approximately two years. The anticipated start date for this activity is September 30, 2014, with one award anticipated as a result of this RFA. WHA invites U.S. non-profit/non-governmental organizations (NGOs) having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, or an equivalent official status, and public and private institutions of higher education to submit proposals to accomplish the following:

This funding will support U.S. Government’s foreign assistance goal to empower Cubans to freely determine their own future by increasing human capacity, promoting community level engagement, and expanding civil society networks by administering a summer program for Cuban high school students focusing on leadership development, civic education principles, and the structure of democratic organizations ranging from national governments to local NGOs and student advocacy groups. Through an open competition, WHA will select an organization that will develop a 3-4 week program in which Cuban youth will travel to the United States to participate in structured, youth-appropriate leadership activities and workshops in a safe environment, interact with American youth and gain first-hand experience of community engagement. To further introduce the students to American culture, students will stay with American families for part of the program. WHA anticipates that the first year of the two-year program would involve a smaller number of students, as few as 25-35, and could increase to 50-65 for the second year for a total of 75-100 participants. Alumni from the first year of the program would assist with orientation of future students. There is no English language requirement for participants; the program will be conducted in Spanish. Applicants must articulate how the program will accommodate Spanish language speakers. To maximize the cultural and linguistic benefit for the Cuban students, WHA strongly encourages applicants to consider the demographic and geographic diversity of the US in project planning. The program for the first group students would begin in summer 2015.

WHA reserves the right to fund any or none of the applications submitted and will determine the resulting level of funding for the award pending availability of funds. The authority for this RFA is found in the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended. Should the program prove successful, WHA may consider additional supplemental funding to continue activities and extend the period of performance, or to support work on additional activities, if funds are available and WHA and the Recipient mutually agree. Competitive applications received for this RFA but not selected may be considered for future funding.

Eligible organizations interested in submitting an application are encouraged to read this RFA thoroughly to understand the type of project sought and the application submission requirements and evaluation process.

For further information, please contact:
WHAGrants@state.gov

REQUEST FOR APPLICATIONS

The United States Department of State (DOS) Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA) is seeking applications from qualified Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Educational Institutions and other qualified organizations for a grant to implement a project entitled Summer Leadership Program for Cuban Youth. The authority for this Request for Application (RFA) is found in the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity Act and full year Continuing Appropriations Act, 2013.

Applicants under consideration for an award that have never received funding from WHA will likely be subject to a pre-award survey to determine fiscal responsibility and ensure adequacy of financial controls. This survey contains a list of criteria for determining whether the applicant’s accounting system meets the minimum standards to be eligible for USG funding. These standards include appropriate accounting software and written financial management policies and accounting procedures. The pre-award survey will involve assessing the extent to which these are in place within an organization and being actively implemented. Refer to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Administration’s Sample Pre-Award Survey uploaded as part of the application package on www.Grants.gov for further information.

Subject to the availability of funds, WHA intends to issue an award in an amount not to exceed $1,212,000 in total funding. The U.S Dollar amount will be awarded from WHA allocated funds, for a project period not to exceed 26 months. The anticipated start date for this activity is September 2014 with the first group of students traveling in the summer of 2015, and a second group in summer 2016. One award is anticipated as a result of this RFA. WHA reserves the right to fund any or none of the applications submitted and will determine the resulting level of funding for the award. Organizations may submit only one application for this RFA. Should the program prove successful, WHA may consider additional supplemental funding to continue activities and extend the period of performance, or to support work on additional activities, if funds are available and WHA and the Recipient mutually agree. Competitive applications received for this RFA but not selected may be considered for future funding.

Eligible organizations interested in submitting an application are encouraged to read this RFA thoroughly to understand the type of project sought and the application submission requirements and evaluation process.

To be eligible for award, the applicant must submit all required information in its application through Grants.gov, including the requirements found in any attachments to this Grants.gov opportunity. This RFA consists of this cover letter plus the following Sections:

1. Section I – Funding Opportunity Description
2. Section II – Award Information
3. Section III – Eligibility information
4. Section IV – Application and Submission Instructions
5. Section V – Application and Review Information
6. Section VI – Agency Contacts

This funding opportunity is posted on www.Grants.gov and may be amended. In order to apply, applicants must have a Grants Solutions account. See Section IV for further details. Potential applicants should regularly check the grants.gov website to ensure they have the latest information pertaining to this RFA. Applicants will need to have available or download Adobe program to their computers in order to view and save the Adobe forms properly. If you have difficulty registering on www.Grants.gov or accessing the RFA, please contact the grants.gov Helpdesk at 1-800-518-4726 or via email at support@Grants.gov for technical assistance.

It is the responsibility of the recipient of this RFA document to ensure that it has been received from Grants.gov in its entirety. WHA bears no responsibility for data errors resulting from transmission or conversion processes associated with electronic submissions.

Any questions concerning this RFA should be submitted in writing to WHAGrants@state.gov. The deadline for submission of questions for this RFA is June 24, 2014 at 5:00 PM Eastern Standard Time. No exceptions to the deadline will be made. Responses to questions will be made available to all potential applicants through an amendment to this RFA and posted on Grants.gov.

Issuance of this RFA does not constitute an award commitment on the part of the U.S. government, nor does it commit the U.S. government to pay for costs incurred in the preparation and submission of an application. In addition, final award of any resultant grant agreement cannot be made until funds have been fully appropriated, allocated, and committed through internal WHA procedures. While it is anticipated that these procedures will be successfully completed, potential applicants are hereby notified of these requirements and conditions for award. Applications are submitted at the risk of the applicant. The recipient may need to apply for and operate under an Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) license prior to conducting certain program activities with Cuba.

SECTION I – FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION

BACKGROUND

U.S. foreign assistance for Cuba seeks to empower Cubans to freely determine their own future by increasing human capacity, promoting community level engagement, and expanding civil society networks. Since 1996, the United States has provided assistance to increase the flow of information on democracy, human rights, and free enterprise to Cuba, and Cuba programs have supported the goal of helping develop civil society through a variety of U.S.-based non-governmental organizations. This is an effort to widen the scope of the civic groups receiving support, aiming to engage and strengthen a range of independent elements of Cuban civil society, including youth.

WHA has engaged with individual civil society groups on education, communication and governance issues and has provided training on topics such as computer skills and journalism. WHA seeks to build upon these earlier, successful education efforts and provide opportunities to Cuban youth develop leadership skills, and learn about democratic organizations and community engagement by participating in workshops and activities. With an increased ability to travel internationally, Cubans are eager for more information and want to take advantage of educational opportunities not afforded to them in Cuba.

To support the Cuban people and youth development, the U.S. Department of State has allocated up to USD $1,212,000 in FY 2013 Economic Support Funds to provide Cuban youth opportunities to develop leadership skills and learn about civic participation and community engagement.

PROJECT PURPOSE

The purpose of the project is to provide opportunities for Cuban youth to participate in typical American youth development activities including clubs, organizations, and camps in order to develop leadership skills, an understanding of democratic principles and the role of civic action in engaging communities.

PROJECT GOALS

The following list reflects the project goals:
  • Cuban youth will exhibit leadership skills such as public speaking, team building, negotiating, consensus building, conflict resolution, self-advocacy, and problem solving.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the functioning of democratic principles in organizations such as boards of directors or student groups, formal channels of communication for input and feedback, checks and balances, voting, representation, advocacy for constituents, transparency, and accountability.
  • Gain an understanding of the role of civic action and community engagement such as conducting a community needs assessment, identifying resources, advocating, and organizing and participating in community activities.
PROJECT OUTCOMES

The following outcomes will indicate a successful project:

  • Students will self-identify and act as role models and leaders among their peers.
  • Students will demonstrate and employ critical thinking skills including analysis and decision making skills.
  • Students will demonstrate the ability to collaborate, communicate, solve problems and resolve conflict effectively.
  • Students will know how youth groups, organizations and governments effectively employ democratic principles in achieving objectives.
PROJECT OBJECTIVES

Objective 1: By the end of the program, 75-100 Cuban students will have learned leadership and organizational skills in topics or activities that are relevant to youth, boards of directors, youth advocacy groups, clubs for youth (activity or hobby clubs, professional development or early career groups, art, sports and culture groups), etc.

Activity 1.1: Students learn basic leadership skills and tenets including critical thinking skills, self–initiative, goal setting, and organization skills.

Activity 1.2: Students visit or participate in youth –centered clubs, organizations and activities.

Activity 1.3: Students are trained in basic steps in project design such as identifying needs, setting goals, identifying resources, and making a timeline to prepare for the Capstone Project.

Objective 2: By the end of the program, students will have knowledge of civic participation, community engagement and advocacy, especially for youth-centered issues.

Activity 2.1: Students will meet, observe and participate in activities with youth organizations, advocacy groups, student councils or other student groups to learn how such groups are structured and implemented for a minimum of two weeks of the three to four week program.

Activity 2.2 Students will participate in at least one community service activity. The program should provide steps in the process including identifying community needs, volunteerism, charitable giving, etc.

Activity 2.3 Students will participate in regular debriefing to share experiences with each other so that the activities are not isolated events and provides context for other activities.

STATEMENT OF WORK

The Bureau of Western Hemisphere affairs is supporting the engagement of teenagers in an intensive, substantive three- to four-week-long summer program in the United States.

The responsibilities of the award recipient(s) will be the following:
  • Recruitment and Selection of Cuban participants
  • Develop plans for outreach and recruitment that will generate a strong pool of qualified candidates.
  • Develop an application and screening process.
  • Conduct a merit-based selection process for participants, ages 16-18, with clearly identified criteria for the selection consistent with local law.
  • Recommend the final participants and alternates to the U.S. Department of State.
Applicants should include in the budget the following project staff travel to Havana, Cuba: one to two project staff for each selection of student cohorts (two trips total), and one project staff to conduct pre-departure orientation for each student cohort (two trips total). Travel permission is TBD. The recipient may need to apply for and operate under an Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) license prior to conducting certain program activities with Cuba, including travel.
WHA anticipates a total of 75-100 youth participating over two years, with approximately 25-35 participants in the summer program for 2015, and approximately 50-65 students in the summer of 2016. The returned participants from the first cohort may assist in orientation of the second cohort.

Preparation
  • Contact all participants before departure to provide them with program information and pre-departure materials.
  • Provide student participants with assistance regarding the process of applying for a US visa. USINT will facilitate the timely scheduling of visa interviews for selected candidates. 
  • Conduct a pre-departure orientation in Cuba for participants and parents, including general and program-specific information, as well as intercultural training.
  • Hire and train staff, as needed, to accompany participants during the exchange period. Criminal background checks, including a search of the Department of Justice's National Sex Offender Public Registry, must be conducted for all staff.
  • Design and conduct an orientation(s) for project staff, American host families, and those individuals participating from the U.S. host communities on the goals of the program and to the cultures and sensitivities of Cuban participants. The orientation for Americans may be held in person or conducted virtually with permission of WHA.
  • Incorporate language training, language materials, translators, or other strategies to support the Spanish-speaking participants both during the activities and at homestays.
  • Carefully recruit, screen, and select diverse local host families with at least one Spanish-speaking member to offer homestays for 6-8 days of the program for all participants. Criminal background checks, including a search of the Department of Justice's National Sex Offender Public Registry, must be conducted for members of host families and others living in the home who are 18 years or older.
  • Make housing arrangements for all participants at a dormitory, hotel or similar venue for the balance of the program. Monitor housing arrangements to ensure the health and safety of participants.
  • Make travel arrangements for the participants including appropriate adult supervision and assistance.
Program Activities
  • Design, plan, and implement an intensive and substantive three- to four-week long program on the stated themes in Spanish. Training in basic English language skills is acceptable as part of the program. Exchange activities must promote program goals.
  • Arrange appropriate community, cultural, social, and civic activities.
  • Engage participants in at least one facilitated community service activity during the U.S. program to demonstrate American volunteerism. The program should provide context for the participants to undertake the service activity – identifying community needs, the nature of volunteerism, charitable giving, etc., and a debriefing so that the service activity is not an isolated event, but is integrated into the larger program curriculum, and to help participants see if they can apply the experience at home.
  • Provide day-to-day monitoring and support of the participants’ well-being, preventing and dealing with any misunderstandings or adjustment issues that may arise.
  • Design a structured Capstone Project that participants will complete to synthesize learning, summarize the project activities, and prepare participants for their return home. The Capstone Project is an opportunity for participants to demonstrate what they learned, and may include a written articulation of learning outcomes or a project or activity they plan and implement as a result of skills learned. The applicant should describe and define the Capstone Project in their application.
  • Work in consultation with WHA in the implementation of the program, provide timely reporting of progress, and comply with financial and program reporting requirements.
  • Manage all financial aspects of the program, including stipend disbursements to the participants and management of any sub-award relationships with partner organizations. Use grant funds to cover airfare, lodging, stipends, insurance, visa costs, and any other costs for student participants.
  • Design and implement an evaluation plan that assesses the impact of the program. See Monitoring and Evaluation section for more details.
PROGRAM SPECIFIC GUIDELINES

Participants: Participants will be Cuban teenagers between the ages of 16 and 18 who have a strong interest in developing leadership skills, learning about community engagement, and traveling to the United States. Participants will demonstrate an aptitude for a program of this nature, as well as personal qualities that will enable them to be successful participants, including maturity, strong social skills, flexibility, and open-mindedness.

English proficiency for participants is NOT required. Applicants should articulate a plan that accommodates Spanish language speaking participants, accounting for translators and/or engaging host institutions or programs where Spanish is spoken. Training in basic English language skills is acceptable as part of the program.

Participant Selection: The award recipient will develop all promotional and application materials and play a primary role in selecting students. The U.S. Interests Section in Havana will assist the award recipient in disseminating promotional materials and in student selection. Parent or guardian approval must be obtained.

Logistics: Since participants will be minors, may be inexperienced travelers, and will be traveling from their home country without their families, applicants will present a plan for adult supervision/accompaniment including assistance in airports and at other points of transit.

Pre-departure Orientation: The award recipient will provide participants with a pre-departure orientation, reviewing the details of the program, cross-cultural issues, and travel and financial matters. The grant recipient will provide written materials on a USB or CD and hard copy, if feasible, in support of this orientation prior to the participants’ departure from home.

U.S. Program: The program delivery should be primarily interactive activities, practical experiences, and other hands-on opportunities to learn about the fundamentals of a civil society, leadership skills, critical thinking, democratic principles and community service. The activities could include participation in clubs, camps, seminars, workshops, simulations and role-playing, teambuilding exercises, case studies, a volunteer service project, leadership training exercises, meetings, classroom visits, site visits, and social time among peers. Other activities may include visits to historical sites, local, state and/or national government centers, community centers, non-governmental organizations, museums and landmarks that combine learning about the principles of government, history, and society with tourism. Age-appropriate cultural enrichment activities that provide opportunities for participants to interact with each other and Americans may also be part of the program. Programming should include additional American participants wherever possible, accounting for a lack of English language proficiency from Cuban participants.

The program may also include a maximum three day study tour to Washington, DC.

Housing Accommodations: Homestays with local families with at least one Spanish-speaking member must be arranged for all participants for 6-8 days of the program. A dormitory, hotel, or other housing with appropriate adult supervision is an acceptable arrangement for other segments of the program.

Applicants must present in their proposals a clear and detailed recruitment, screening, and selection process for host families. The recipient must also provide the families with an orientation prior to the arrival of their exchange participants, emphasizing the goals of the program. Screening needs to include a visit to the home to meet all members of the household to ensure that the host family is capable of providing a comfortable and nurturing home environment. Criminal background checks, including a search of the Department of Justice's National Sex Offender Public Registry, must be conducted for members of host families (and others living in the home) who are 18 years or older. The orientation will provide families with detailed information on the exchange program, the parameters of their participation, duties and obligations, and information on cultural differences and practices.

WHA encourages diversity in the recruitment and selection of host families. They may represent diversity in family size and structure, race and ethnicity, socio-economic status, religion, and geography. While exchange participants may share a room with someone of a similar age and the same gender, they must have their own beds and private space. Participants may be placed with host families as singles or in pairs. Host families need to have adequate financial resources to undertake hosting obligations.

Applicants must also explain how they will provide adequate supervision of participants when not in homestays.

Evaluation: The Government Performance and Results Modernization Act (GPRA) of 2010 requires that federal agencies measure the results of their programs in meeting performance goals. The proposal should demonstrate the applicant’s plan to measure the long-term impact of the program. The follow-on activities will provide an opportunity to assess the impact of the U.S. project on the participants, to determine how their attitudes have changed, and to evaluate the acquisition of knowledge and skills associated with the program themes.

DESIRED RESULTS AND ILLUSTRATIVE INDICATORS

The recipient will develop a project-level Performance Monitoring plan (PMP) with annual and end-of- project targets and results anticipated for key performance indicators for this project. The following table shows indicators that will be measured, as well as illustrative targets, which the recipient will be responsible for monitoring and reporting during and after the project. In addition, WHA will regularly monitor the project’s performance to assess whether project activities are on track and targets are being achieved.

Example Outcome indicators for the project are provided below. The recipient is expected to identify targets for these indicators based on what it can reasonably achieve within the performance period of the project, and based on the expected overall project results described above. Measurement methods must be specified for all outcome indicators, and proposed outcomes must be clearly and logically linked to outputs.

Output indicators and illustrative targets for the project are provided below. The recipient should review these and either confirm the illustrative targets or propose alternative targets, as appropriate.

The recipient may propose additional outputs, indicators, and/or targets as appropriate. The recipient will be required to collect baseline data for all the Performance Monitoring Plan indicators during the first year of the project. In addition, certain terms included in the outcomes and indicators will need to be defined at the very beginning of the project so that it is possible to measure the change during and at the end of the project. Examples of such are “capacity”, “knowledge”, etc. Baseline information will be critical for both monitoring and evaluation of project progress and results.

[END OF SECTION I]

SECTION II – AWARD INFORMATION

The Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs expects to award a grant agreement based on this RFA, subject to the availability of funds. The anticipated total federal funding amount is $1,212,000 The period of performance is two years with an anticipated start date of September 2014.

The U.S. government anticipates issuing one award resulting from this RFA to the responsible applicant whose application conforming to this RFA are the most responsive to the objectives set forth in this RFA. The U.S. government may (a) reject any or all applications, (b) accept other than the lowest cost application, (c) accept more than one application, (d) accept alternate applications, and (e) waive informalities and minor irregularities in applications received. Should the program prove successful, WHA may consider additional supplemental funding to continue activities and extend the period of performance, or to support work on additional activities, if funds are available and WHA and the Recipient mutually agree. Competitive applications received for this RFA but not selected may be considered for future funding.

The U.S. government may make award on the basis of initial applications received, without discussions or negotiations. Therefore, each initial application should contain the applicant's best terms from a cost and technical standpoint. The U.S. government reserves the right (but is not under obligation to do so), however, to enter into discussions with one or more applicants in order to obtain clarifications, additional detail, or to suggest refinements in the program description, budget, or other aspects of an application.

Approval of Travel and Sub Awards

Approval means written consent by an authorized official.  Only the Grants Officer for the agreement is authorized to provide such prior consent. 
For purposes of this provision, "foreign travel" includes any travel outside Canada, Mexico, the United States, and any United States territories and possessions. However, the term "foreign travel" for a non-profit organization located in a foreign country means travel outside that country.
Travel costs are defined as expenses for transportation, lodging, subsistence, and any other costs budgeted for the implementation of travel under the grant.  
Travel can be considered approved during the initial award phase if the final grant documents include the travel costs as described above and origin/destination for each international trip.  The Grants Officer requires the country of origin and destination to be approved.  For travel to Cuba, however, only the region of origin is required (Latin America, Europe, etc.).
Otherwise, if travel costs for each individual trip are not present in the final approved award documents, the activities will need to be official approved by the Grants Officer in writing during the grant period.  All travel must be approved prior to being carried out.

Approval of subawards:

Approval means written consent by an authorized official.  For awards with WHA, only the Grants Officer for the agreement is authorized to provide such prior consent.  The Department of State does not provide official approval of specific award terms and conditions.  If upon review certain terms and conditions are found to be missing, DOS may request amendments of subawards.
“Subaward” means an award of financial assistance in the form of money, or property in lieu of money, made under an award by a recipient to an eligible subrecipient or by a subrecipient to a lower tier subrecipient. The term includes financial assistance when provided by any legal agreement, even if the agreement is called a contract, but does not include procurement of goods and services nor does it include: technical assistance, which provides services instead of money; other assistance in the form of loans, loan guarantees, interest subsidies, or insurance; direct payments of any kind to individuals; and, contracts which are required to be entered into and administered under procurement laws and regulations.
“Subrecipient” means the legal entity to which a subaward is made and which is accountable to the recipient for the use of the funds provided. The term may include foreign or international organizations (such as agencies of the United Nations) at the discretion of the Federal awarding agency.
Unless described in the application and funded in the approved awards, the recipients shall request prior approvals from Federal awarding agencies for any subaward, transfer or contracting out of any work under an award. This approval is also required for any changes of subrecipients.
To effectively describe proposed sub-awards in the application, the applicant must provide the following:

For organizations:
  • The name of the sub-awardee, and (a) in the case of a for-profit commercial organization, the place of incorporation; or (b) in the case of a partnership, the place where legally organized; or (c) in the case of a non-profit organization, the place where legally organized.
  • The program description, statement of work, or terms of reference, period of performance, and country of performance.
  • The total estimated cost, including a detailed line-item budget and budget narrative that also includes proposed cost share, if applicable, and a copy of any current indirect cost rate agreement between the U.S. Government and the sub-awardee. 
For individuals:
  • The program description, statement of work, or terms of reference, period of performance, and country of performance.
  • The total estimated cost, including a breakdown of any expenses (such as travel, proposed daily rate, salary, stipend, or honorarium (whichever applies), etc.) and proposed cost share. The recipient must also provide a description of the experience level and professional background if any fee is to be received by the subawardee or if any fee is provided as cost share under the agreement.
Although the recipient is not required to provide the name of the individual, it must ensure that all appropriate vetting is conducted to ensure that subawards are not entered into with those who are debarred, suspended or otherwise excluded from or ineligible for participation in Federal assistance programs or activities.
A sub-awardee must submit any of the following to the WHA Grants Officer, through the prime recipient, for approval:
  • Requests for International Travel;
  • Requests to enter further sub-awards or sub-contracts, including sub-contracts with program consultants; and
  • Approval to purchase commodities.
Note that requests for approval shall not be limited to the above list.  Other actions may require Grants Officer approval and the prime recipient may be asked to provide a request for approval at the discretion of the Grants Officer.

If complete documentation responding to the items listed above is not provided with the application or during the pre-award negotiation process, the Grants Officer may delay or stop processing the application for award.

[END OF SECTION II]

SECTION III – ELIGIBLITY INFORMATION

(1) Eligible Entities: Applicants who are eligible to apply are U.S. non-profit/non-governmental organizations (NGOs) having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, or an equivalent official status, and public and private institutions of higher education who are able to respond to the RFA and be able to mobilize in a short period of time. Organizations that have worked in Cuba or similarly restricted environments are encouraged to apply.

To be eligible for a grant award, in addition to other conditions of this RFA, organizations must have a commitment to non‐discrimination with respect to beneficiaries and adherence to equal opportunity employment practices. Non‐discrimination includes equal treatment without regard to race, religion, ethnicity, gender, and political affiliation.

Applicants are reminded that U.S. Executive Orders and U.S. law prohibits transactions with, and the provision of resources and support to, individuals and organizations associated with terrorism. It is the legal responsibility of the Recipient to ensure compliance with these Executive Orders and laws. This provision must be included in any sub-awards issued under this grant award.

(2) WHA encourages applications from potential new partners but award totals may be reduced if the applicant has never before received federal funds. WHA is seeking experienced and capable prime grantees for this program, so organizations with less than four years’ experience in conducting international exchanges and programming are ineligible to apply under this competition. A prime applicant may include less experienced sub-grantees in its proposal.

[END OF SECTION III]

SECTION IV – APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

WHA urges prospective applicants to immediately confirm their organization has a current Dun and Bradstreet (DUNS) number, a current Central Contractor Registration (www.sam.gov), a current GrantSolutions.gov account, and a current grants.gov account. No exceptions will be made to the proposal deadline.

TECHNICAL FORMAT REQUIREMENTS

For all application documents, please ensure:
A) All pages are numbered, including budgets and attachments,
B) All documents are formatted to 8 ½ x 11 paper, and
C) All Microsoft Word documents are single-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font, with a minimum of 1-inch margins.

Complete applications must include the following for proposal submissions:
1. Completed and signed SF-424, SF-424a and SF424b, submitted to grants.gov, as well as your organization’s most recent A-133 audit or other recent audit or audited financial statements.
2. Table of Contents (not to exceed one [1] page in Microsoft Word) that includes a page-numbered contents page, including any attachments.
3. Executive Summary (not to exceed two [2] pages in Microsoft Word) that includes:
a) the target country(ies),
b) name and contact information for the project’s main point of contact,
c) a statement of work or synopsis of the program, including a concise breakdown of the project’s objectives, activities, and expected results,
d) the total amount of funding requested and program length, and
e) a brief statement on how the project is innovative, sustainable, and will have a demonstrated impact.
4. Proposal Narrative (not to exceed ten [10] pages in Microsoft Word). Please note the ten page limit does not include the Table of Contents, Executive Summary, Attachments, Detailed Budget, Budget Narrative or NICRA. Applicants are encouraged to submit multiple documents in a single Microsoft Word, (i.e., Table of Contents, Executive Summary, Proposal Narrative, and Budget Narrative in one file).
5. Budget Narrative (preferably in Microsoft Word) that includes an explanation and justification for each line item in the detailed budget spreadsheet, as well as the source and a description of all cost-share offered. For ease of review, WHA recommends applicants order the budget narrative as presented in the detailed budget. Personnel costs should include a clarification of the roles and responsibilities of key staff and percentage of time devoted to the project. The budget narrative should communicate to WHA any information that might not be readily apparent in the budget, not simply repeat with words what is stated numerically in the budget.
6. Detailed Line-Item Budget (preferably in Microsoft Excel) that includes three [3] columns including the request to WHA any cost sharing contribution, and total budget (see below for more information on budget format). A summary budget should also be included using the OMB approved budget categories (see SF-424 as a sample). Costs must be in U.S. dollars.
7. Attachments (not to exceed nine [9] pages total, preferably in Microsoft Word) that include the following in order:
a) Page 1-2: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan (see below for more information on this section).
b) Page 3: Roles and responsibilities of key program personnel with short bios that highlight relevant professional experience. This relates to the organization’s capacity. Given the limited space, CVs are not recommended for submission.
c) Page 4: Timeline of the overall proposal. Components should include activities, evaluation efforts, and program closeout.
d) Page 5-7: Additional optional attachments. Attachments may include further timeline information, letters of support, memoranda of understanding (MOU)/agreement, etc. For applicants with a large number of letters/MOUs, it may be useful to provide a list of the organizations or government agencies that support the program rather than the actual documentation.
8. If your organization has a negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) and will include NICRA charges in the budget, your latest NICRA must be included as a .pdf file. This document will not be reviewed by the panelists, but rather used by program and grant staff if the submission is recommended for funding and therefore does not count against the submission page limitations, as described above. If your proposal involves subgrants to organizations charging indirect costs, please submit the applicable NICRA also as a .pdf file (see below for more information on indirect cost rates).
Note: WHA retains the right to request additional documentation for those items not included on this form.
Note: To ensure all applications receive a balanced review process, the WHA Review Committee will review the first page of the requested section up to the page limit and no further. WHA encourages organizations to use the given space effectively.
9. Upon selection, grantees new to WHA will complete a Financial Management Survey (attached), including all supporting documentation as requested in the Survey; Copies of the following documents from your organization: articles of incorporation; bylaws; IRS 501(c)(3) designation if applicable; list of board members; minutes of board of directors meetings; standards of conduct for board of directors; and an organizational chart;

INFORMATION ON STANDARD FORMS
Please see Tab D for instructions for completion of Standard Forms 424, 424A, and 424B.

OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET (OMB) CIRCULARS
Organizations should be familiar with 22 CFR 215, 22 CFR 145 (Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals and Other Nonprofit Organizations), 22 CFR 220 and 230 (Cost Principles for Nonprofit Organizations; Indirect Costs), and A-133/A-128 (Audits of Institutions of Higher Education and Other Nonprofit Organizations) on cost accounting principles. For a copy of the OMB circulars cited, please contact Government Publications or download from http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/index.html. Overseas-based nonprofit organizations are not legally required to comply with the OMB requirements, but are encouraged to address them and use them as guidance.

AUDITS
Audit costs may be allowable if the audit:
1) Complies with the requirements of OMB Circular No. A-133, "Audits for Institutions of Higher Education and Other Nonprofit Institutions";
2) Complies with the requirements of American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) Statement of Position (SOP) No. 92-9, "Audits of Not-for-Profit Organizations Receiving Federal Awards";
3) Complies with AICPA Codification of Statements on Auditing Standards AU Section 551, "Reporting on Information Accompanying the Basic Financial Statements in Auditor-Submitted Documents," where applicable. When the U.S. Department of State is the largest direct source of Federal financial assistance (i.e., the cognizant Federal Agency) and indirect costs are charged to Federal grants, a supplemental schedule of indirect cost computation is required.

The audit costs shall be identified for: the audit of the basic financial statements, and supplemental reports and schedules required by A-133.

REPORTING
See Tab B below. Recipients will be required to submit quarterly progress and financial reports. Progress reports, using standard forms for all US –funded swards, will be uploaded to Grantsolutions.gov, and financial reports will be submitted through the Payment Management System and uploaded to Grantsolutions.gov.

INDIRECT COST-RATE
An organization with a negotiated indirect cost rate agreement (NICRA) negotiated with a cognizant federal government agency other than the U.S. Department of State must include a copy of the cost-rate agreement. Applicants should indicate in the proposal budget how the rate is applied and if any of the rate will be cost-shared. Organizations claiming indirect costs must have an established NICRA. If subgrantees are claiming indirect costs, they must have an established NICRA that is also submitted with the proposal package. If no such NICRA exists for the overseas organization, costs should be allocated instead as direct costs.

TAB A: PROPOSAL GUIDELINES

Proposals should include the following components:
  • Introduction and Problem Statement
  • Planned Activities
  • Indicators
Problem Statement and Rationale: Describe the problem and how the project will achieve or contribute to achieving a sustainable solution and a measurable outcome. The implementer should also explain, as necessary, the particular experience and qualifications they bring to the project. The rationale should also reflect understanding of the priorities and policies of the bureau/post or program with which this agreement is associated.

Planned Activities and Indicators: Describe the planned activities, and relevant stakeholders for implementation. The implementer should highlight key stakeholders and their expected role in the project, along with any contingencies. The implementer should list assumptions that are dependent on the ultimate success of the project. This could include elements like geographic location, coordination efforts with other international organizations, or political will from host governments, private sector, and NGOs. As appropriate, limited contingency possibilities should be included in the proposal, in case the initial planning assumptions are not met. Example of a planned activity and contingency:

In the proposal, there should be a clearly defined link between each of the following elements as delineated:

Process Indicators measure the activity that has been completed. Please delineate the specific activities to be conducted, such as workshops, roundtables, trainings, forums, exchanges, policy dialogues, etc. All indicators must include targets. Example of a process indicator:

Output Indicators, otherwise known as deliverables associated with the agreement, should be included. Unlike process indicators, outputs are what is produced, and are often tangible. At this level, it is the measurement of ability, knowledge, skills, or access. All indicators must include targets. Example of an output indicator involving the same participants:

Outcome Indicators measure the change in system or behavior or practice. Expected outcomes are the results that come from a series of activities that are necessary to achieve impact. All indicators must include targets. Example of an outcome indicator:

All indicators must include measurable, numerical targets, which should serve as the foundation for monitoring and evaluation efforts. Ultimately, proposed activities and achievement of indicator targets will lead to impact, as follows:

TAB B: PROGRAM MONITORING AND EVALUATION PLAN

WHA will work with recipient organizations to implement the appropriate monitoring and evaluation plan consistent with required federal reporting that meets both the needs of WHA and the implementing partner. Incorporating a well-designed monitoring and evaluation component into a project is one of the most efficient methods of documenting the progress and potential success of a program. Successful monitoring and evaluation depend on the following:

Setting objectives that are specific, measurable, attainable, , results-focused, and placed in a reasonable time frame (SMART);
Linking program activities to stated objectives;
Developing key performance indicators that measure realistic progress towards the objectives.

WHA expects implementing organizations will track participants or partners as appropriate and be able to respond to key evaluation questions, including satisfaction with the program/training, information learned as a result of the program/training, and changes in attitude and behavior as a result of the program to the extent practical and based on the specific country context of the participants. WHA also expects external monitoring and evaluation on the recipient’s programmatic design and implementation including sequencing of activities and linkages. The inclusion of an external evaluator, especially one with experience with similar student programs, is strongly encouraged. Applicants should include the monitoring and evaluation process in their timeline.

Recipients will be required to provide reports with an analysis and summary of their findings, both quantitative and qualitative, in their regular progress reports to WHA.

The monitoring and evaluation plan should include, at a minimum, the following elements:
A results “Logic Model” planning document (see sample)
Indicators, as described in Tab A, as well as details on how each indicator will be measured, frequency of the measurements, units of measure, etc. Provide indicators at the output and outcome levels. Monitoring and evaluation plans should include a chart component that clearly delineates indicators and targets. All indicators must include measurable, numerical targets.
Establish, where possible, performance baseline data and expected performance targets for each indicator/outcome. In some cases, the baseline may be zero.
Describe monitoring and evaluation tools, such as rapid assessment surveys, site visits, key stakeholder interviews, etc., that will be used.
Plans should describe how the project’s impact and effectiveness will be monitored and evaluated throughout the project.

Sample Evaluation Plan


Sample “Logic Model” Planning Tool

Note: Outcomes, outputs, and activities should include numerical, measurable targets. A Logic Model is a useful tool for planning and utilized when designing monitoring and evaluation methodology and frameworks.

TAB C: BUDGET GUIDELINES

Complete budgets will provide a detailed line-item budget outlining specific cost requirements for proposed activities. A minimum of three columns should be used to delineate the bureau funding request, cost-share by applicant, and total project funding. Complete applications will include a budget narrative to clarify and justify individual line-items (i.e. calculations of how the costs were derived per month or year, their necessity, and overall contribution to the program’s cost-effectiveness).

The three-column proposal line item budget should include the following components, in the suggested format below:

Note: This budget is designed to serve as an example of the format for complete budget submissions and is NOT exhaustive. Individual line items included in each applicant’s budget should reflect specific program activities. (pax = participants)

Before grants are awarded, WHA reserves the right to reduce, revise, or increase proposal budgets in accordance with the needs of WHA’s program and availability of funds.

As mentioned above, the detailed budget should also include an accompanying budget notes document that explains and justifies each line item, in the suggested format below:

LINE-ITEM BUDGET –

A. Personnel – Identify staffing requirements by each position title and brief description of duties. For clarity, please list the annual salary of each position, percentage of time and number of months devoted to the project. (e.g., Administrative Director: $30,000/year x 25% x 8.5 months; calculation: $30,000/12 = $2,500 x 25% x 8.5 months = $5,312.).

B. Fringe Benefits - State benefit costs separately from salary costs and explain how benefits are computed for each category of employee - specify type and rate.

C. Travel - Staff and any participant travel:
1) international airfare
2) in-country travel
3) domestic travel in Country X., if any
4) per diem/maintenance: includes lodging, meals and incidentals for both participant and staff travel. Rates of maximum allowances for U.S. and foreign travel are available from the following website: http:/www.policyworks.gov/. Per diem rates may not exceed the published U.S. government allowance rates; however, institutions may use per diem rates lower than official government rates.
5) staff refers to grantee staff only, and not sub-grantee staff or contractors

D. Equipment – please provide justification for any equipment purchase/rental, defined as tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5000 or more.

E. Supplies - list items separately using unit costs (and the percentage of each unit cost being charged to the grant) for photocopying, postage, telephone/fax, printing, and office supplies (e.g., Telephone: $50/month x 50% = $25/month x 12 months).

F. Contractual –

a) Subgrants. For each subgrant/contract please provide a detailed line-item budget breakdown explaining specific services. Please provide a subgrant budget using the approved OMB budget format. (See Tab C: Budget Guidelines, above.)

b) Consultant Fees. For example lecture fees, honoraria, travel, and per diem for outside speakers or independent evaluators: list number of people and rates per day (e.g., 2 x $150/day x 2 days).

G. Other - these will vary depending on the nature of the project. The inclusion of each should be justified in the budget narrative. All costs must be allowable, allocable, and reasonable, and consistent with OMB guidelines. Line items such as “Miscellaneous,” “Contingency Fund,” and “Reserve Fund” are not permitted.

H. Indirect Charges - See OMB Circular A-122, "Cost Principles for Non-profit Organizations"
1) If your organization has an indirect cost-rate agreement with the U.S. Government, please include a copy of this agreement. This does not count against submission page limitations.
2) If your organization is charging an indirect rate, please indicate how the rate is applied--to direct administrative expenses, to all direct costs, to wages and salaries only, etc.
3) Do not include indirect costs against participant expenses in the Bureau budget, as it generally does not pay for these costs.

Cost Share/Cost-Effectiveness - Explanation of contributions should be included, whether cash or in-kind. Assign a monetary value in U.S. dollars to each in-kind contribution. If the proposed project is a component of a larger program, identify other funding sources for the proposal and indicate the specific funding amount to be provided by those sources. In addition, it is recommended that budget narratives address the overall cost-effectiveness of the proposal, including leveraging of institutional or other resources. Costsharing or matching refers to a portion of project or program cost that is not borne by the Federal Government. Grantees must follow cost sharing or matching policy as stipulated in OMB Circular A-110 Section 23. Cost sharing amounts proposed will be incorporated as part of the allowable budget items. If selected for an award, your organization will have to provide the minimum amount of cost sharing as stipulated in the budget approved by the Grants Officer. If your organization does not meet its cost share amount stipulated in the approved budget by the end of the period of performance the Embassy will have the option to (1) reduce its contribution in proportion to your organization’s contribution in the event that you do not provide the minimum amount of cost sharing stipulated in the budget or (2) hold your organization accountable for the amount specified in the approved budget.

BUDGET CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS:

WHA does not pay for the following:

Administration of a program that will make a profit;
Expenses incurred before or after the specified dates of award period of performance (unless prior written approval received);
Projects designed to advocate policy views or positions of foreign governments or views of a particular political faction;
Alcoholic beverages;
Land;
“Contingency funds,” “reserve funds,” or “Miscellaneous Expenses.”

WHA may make conditions and recommendations on proposals to enhance proposed programs. Conditions and recommendations are to be addressed by the applicant before approval of the award. To ensure effective use of WHA funds, conditions or recommendations may include requests to increase, decrease, clarify and/or justify costs.

TAB D: GUIDELINES FOR STANDARD FORMS

SF-424 – Complete all fields except fields noted as “Leave Blank” below.
Type of Submission: Application
Type of Application: New
Date Received: Leave blank. This will automatically be assigned
Applicant Identifier: Leave blank
5a. Federal Entity Identifier: Leave blank
5b. Federal Award Identifier: Leave blank
6. Date Received by State: Leave blank. This will automatically be assigned
7. State Application Identified: Leave blank. This will automatically be assigned
8a. Enter the legal name of the applicant organization.
8b. Employer/Taxpayer ID Number: N/A.
8c. Organizational DUNS: Organizations can request a DUNS number at
http://fedgov.dnb.com/webform
8d. Enter the full address of the applicant
8e. Enter the name of the primary organizational unit (and department or division, if applicable) that will undertake the assistance activity, if applicable
8f. Enter the name, title, organization, and contact information of person to be contacted on matters involving this application
9. Select an applicant type (type of organization)
10. Enter: Cuba
11. Enter: N/A
12. Enter the Funding Opportunity Number and title. This number will already be entered on electronic applications.
13. Enter the Competition Identification Number and title. This number will already be entered on electronic applications.
14. Areas Affected by Project: List the country or countries where project activities will take place in alphabetical order.
15. Enter the title of the proposed project (if necessary, delete pre-printed wording)
16a. Enter congressional district of Applicant.
16b. Enter: 00
Program: Leave blank
17. Enter a start date of October 1, 2014 and a projected end date
18. Enter the amount requested for the project under “Federal”
(18a); enter any cost-share under “Applicant” (18b).
Enter “c”
Select the appropriate box. If you answer “yes” to this question you will be required to provide an explanation.
Enter the name, title, and contact information of the individual authorized to sign for the application.

SF-424A – Please review the detailed instructions below BEFORE completing this form online

Section A - Budget Summary - Complete Row 1
1a. Enter: Cuba (This is the only grant program that needs to be entered)
1b. Enter: N/A
1c-d. Leave these fields blank
1e. Enter the amount of federal funds you are requesting for this project
1f. Enter the amount of any other funds you will receive towards this project
1g. Enter the total cost of this project
Rows 2, 3, and 4 should be left blank.

Section B - Budget Categories – Enter total project costs in each category in Column 1 as described below. In Column 5, the form should automatically show the sum. Columns 2, 3, and 4 should be left blank.
6a-h. Enter the amount for each object class category (Include cost share).
6i. Enter the sum of 6a-6h
6j. Enter any indirect charges
6k. Enter the sum of 6i and 6j
7. Enter any program income that will be earned as a result of the project. If there is none leave this section blank.

Section C - Non-Federal Resources (Only complete this section if your project includes an applicant cost share or funds from other sources)
8a. Under Grant Program enter: Cuba
8b. Enter your cost share amount
8c. Enter the amount of any other funding sources for this project
8d. Leave blank
8e. Enter the total amount for all non-federal resources (the form should automatically show this sum)
Rows 9, 10, and 11 should be left blank.

Section D - Forecasted Cash Needs
13. In the first column enter the amount of federal funds you expect to expend in the project’s first year. Forecasted cash needs by quarter are not required.
14. In the first column enter the amount of non-federal funds you expect to expend in the project’s first year. Forecasted cash needs by quarter are not required.
15. In the first column enter the sum of 13 and 14 (the form should automatically show this sum). Forecasted cash needs by quarter are not required.

Section E - Budget Estimates of Federal Funds Needed for Balance of the Project
16a. Under Grant Program enter: Cuba
16b. Enter the amount of federal funds you expect to expend in year two of the project.
16c. Enter the amount of federal funds you expect ot expend in year three of the project.
16d. and 16e. Leave blank
Rows 17, 18, 19 should be left blank.
20. Enter the total amount for each year (The form should automatically show this sum.)

Section F - Other Budget Information
21. Enter: Direct Charges – Leave Blank
22. Enter: Indirect Charges – If Indirect Charges are shown in Section B 6, enter the type of Indirect Rate used (Provisional, Predetermined, Final, or Fixed)
23. Enter any comments
[END OF SECTION IV] SECTION V – APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION

The technical applications will be evaluated in accordance with the Technical Evaluation Criteria set forth below. Applicants shall organize the narrative sections of their technical applications in the same order as the selection criteria. Technical evaluation of applications will be based on the extent and appropriateness of proposed approaches and feasibility of achieving the strategic objectives, in accordance with the following criteria.

If award is not made on the initial applications, WHA may request clarification and supplemental materials from applicants whose applications have a reasonable chance of being selected for award. The entry into discussion is to be viewed as part of the evaluation process and shall not be deemed by WHA or the applicants as indicative of a decision or commitment upon the part of WHA to make an award to the applicants with whom discussions are being held.

I. TECHNICAL EVALUATION CRITERIA

A technical evaluation committee, using the criteria shown in this Section, will evaluate the technical applications. The various functional elements of the technical criteria are assigned weighted scores, so that the applicants will know which areas require emphasis in the preparation of applications.

Where technical applications are considered essentially equal, cost may be the determining factor. Applicants should note that these criteria serve as the standard against which all applications will be evaluated and serve to identify the significant matters which applicants should address in their applications.

The relative importance of each criterion is indicated by the number of points assigned. A total of 100 points is possible.
Quality of Program Idea (Total possible: 25)
Responsive to the solicitation (5)
Appropriate in the country/regional context (5)
Exhibits originality, substance, and precision (5)
Prioritizes innovation but is feasible (5)
In countries where similar activities are already taking place, provides an explanation as
to how new activities will not duplicate or merely add to existing activities (5)

Program Planning/Ability to Achieve Objectives (Total possible: 25)
Includes a clear articulation of how the proposed program activities contribute to the overall program objectives (3)
Each activity is clearly developed and detailed (3)
Provides a comprehensive quarterly work plan for project activities that demonstrates substantive undertakings within the logistical capacity of the organization (3)
Objectives are clear, specific, attainable, measurable results-focused and placed in a reasonable time frame (3)
Addresses how the program will engage or obtain support from relevant stakeholders where appropriate (3)
Describes the division of labor among the direct applicant, any partners and any potential subgrantees (2)
Proposal clearly articulates understanding of the security situation/operating environment
and plans for ensuring safety of participants (2)
Includes contingency plans for potential difficulties in executing the original work plan (6)

Cost Effectiveness/Cost Sharing (Total possible: 15)
The overhead and administration of the proposal, including salaries and honoraria, are explained and justified for the work involved (5)
All budget items are necessary, appropriate and linked to program objectives (5)
Personnel costs are reasonable for the work involved (5)
Optional: The proposal offers meaningful cost-sharing

Program Monitoring and Evaluation (Total possible: 15)
The Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan includes:
Narrative explaining how monitoring and evaluation will be carried out and who will be responsible for monitoring and evaluation activities (5)
Table listing by program objectives the output- and outcome-based performance indicators with baselines and (yearly and cumulative) targets; data collection tools; data sources; types of data disaggregation, if applicable; and frequency of monitoring and evaluation (7)
Includes an external midterm and/or final evaluation or justification for why one is not included (3)

Multiplier Effect/Sustainability of Impact (Total possible: 10)
Clearly delineates how elements of the program will have a multiplier effect (5)
Clearly delineates how impact will be sustainable beyond the life of the grant (5)

Institution’s Record and Capacity (Total possible: 10)
The proposal demonstrates an institutional record of successful programs in the proposed country, the content area (e.g., youth development, democracy development, education etc), or other (describe) (4)
Personnel and institutional resources are adequate and appropriate to achieve the project's objectives (2)
Roles, responsibilities, and brief bios/resumes are included for primary staff, and demonstrate relevant professional experience (2)
Applicant is a current/past Department of State grantee where performance (2)
was/is on target
showed/shows responsible fiscal management
OR
The proposal is from a NEW APPLICANT and proposal (2)
demonstrates capacity for responsible fiscal management
illustrates success in similar sized projects

COST EVALUATION

Cost will be evaluated for realism, reasonableness, allowability, allocability, and cost effectiveness. The pre-award evaluation of cost effectiveness will include an examination of the application’s budget detail to ensure it is a realistic financial expression of the proposed project and does not contain estimated costs which may be unallocable, unreasonable, or unallowable. Applications that have more efficient operational systems that reduce operation costs will be favorably considered.

Applications that maximize direct activity costs including cost sharing and that minimize administrative costs are encouraged. Other considerations are the completeness of the application, adequacy of budget detail and consistency with elements of the technical application. In addition, the organization must demonstrate adequate financial management capability, to be measured by a responsibility determination.

[END OF SECTION V]


SECTION VI – AGENCY CONTACTS

Any prospective applicant desiring an explanation or interpretation of this RFA must request it in writing by the deadline for questions specified in the cover letter to allow a reply to reach all prospective applicants before the submission of their applications. Any information given to a prospective applicant concerning this RFA will be furnished promptly to all other prospective applicants as an amendment of this RFA, if that information is necessary in submitting applications or if the lack of it would be prejudicial to any other prospective applicants.

All questions or comments concerning this RFA must be submitted in writing by email to WHAGrants@state.gov by the deadline for questions indicated at the top of this RFA’s cover letter.

[END OF SECTION VI]

1 comment:

Moses said...

Excellent idea! I hope the Castros are not set upon punishing these young people and their families for participating in this program.